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There are 41 wars being fought around the world right now. Most of us are busy and we race through our weeks without paying a great deal of attention, but yesterday this week stopped, because one of those wars reached into the sky and grabbed 298 people who could have been any of us.

— CBS’ Scott Pelley, commenting on our shared humanity, after the missile attack of Malaysia Airlines flight MH17 (source)

(Source: jordanfifer)


cocktologize:

In honor of his birth I would like to address some misconceptions about the late great author and pugilist, Mr. Ernest Hemingway.
Yes, he had a stellar beard. Yes, he got a little punchy. Yes, his representation of women as more “things to possess” than actual humans with real merit makes most feminists give him sideways glances. Yes, he lived a well traveled life and has the kind of legend status that men of a certain age romanticize to a disturbing degree. Yes, the man was far from flowery with his prose. And yes, he was most definitely a drunk. But here is my point of divergence from the common lore of Hemingway.
He wasn’t a big rum drinker!
Sure, the man drank rum but the man drank almost anything. Rum however was not his go to. Trust me, as any part time writer and full time drinker knows, rum is a hell of a hangover. All that sugar hits your system and then leaves you cold and alone the next morning. This is not a head space for judicious writing styles. Rum drinkers are more suited for stream of consciousness prose or just plain word soup. 
Writers, especially ones who actually have to get up in the morning and get paid to string words into legible sentences must have a much clearer head.
Rumor has it, his characters imbibed what he was into at the time. Across the board, the most common drink was a whiskey and soda. Like a boss. Because lets be honest, if you drink constantly you need a little soda to settle your tummy.
All that whiskey would explain the more violent tendencies he had. I know I get a little bitey after too much brown sauce.
The second go to drink, a dry Martini. He was a man’s man after all, and there is a lot more performative virility in drinking straight booze, opposed to a minty, muddled, fruity rum drink (mojitos be damned).
So why the classic Hemingway cocktail?
Why rum and fruit juice and Maraschino?
Because he ordered one one time?
Who knows.
The recipe the way I like it:
1,5 white rum
.5 Maraschino 
.25 lime
.75 grapefruit.
sugar rimmed
I like the Hemingway drink a little more than the legend himself but mostly because I have a bizarre respect for my gender.
Happy birthday Papa Bear!
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cocktologize:

In honor of his birth I would like to address some misconceptions about the late great author and pugilist, Mr. Ernest Hemingway.

Yes, he had a stellar beard. Yes, he got a little punchy. Yes, his representation of women as more “things to possess” than actual humans with real merit makes most feminists give him sideways glances. Yes, he lived a well traveled life and has the kind of legend status that men of a certain age romanticize to a disturbing degree. Yes, the man was far from flowery with his prose. And yes, he was most definitely a drunk. But here is my point of divergence from the common lore of Hemingway.

He wasn’t a big rum drinker!

Sure, the man drank rum but the man drank almost anything. Rum however was not his go to. Trust me, as any part time writer and full time drinker knows, rum is a hell of a hangover. All that sugar hits your system and then leaves you cold and alone the next morning. This is not a head space for judicious writing styles. Rum drinkers are more suited for stream of consciousness prose or just plain word soup. 

Writers, especially ones who actually have to get up in the morning and get paid to string words into legible sentences must have a much clearer head.

Rumor has it, his characters imbibed what he was into at the time. Across the board, the most common drink was a whiskey and soda. Like a boss. Because lets be honest, if you drink constantly you need a little soda to settle your tummy.

All that whiskey would explain the more violent tendencies he had. I know I get a little bitey after too much brown sauce.

The second go to drink, a dry Martini. He was a man’s man after all, and there is a lot more performative virility in drinking straight booze, opposed to a minty, muddled, fruity rum drink (mojitos be damned).

So why the classic Hemingway cocktail?

Why rum and fruit juice and Maraschino?

Because he ordered one one time?

Who knows.

The recipe the way I like it:

  • 1,5 white rum
  • .5 Maraschino 
  • .25 lime
  • .75 grapefruit.
  • sugar rimmed

I like the Hemingway drink a little more than the legend himself but mostly because I have a bizarre respect for my gender.

Happy birthday Papa Bear!